Brexit: Thornberry shows Labour’s true colours as she pulls rug from under UK-NZ deal

Brexit: EU ‘forced to concede’ says former Tory MP

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Ms Thornberry, who has been very much in favour of Remain in the past, and has also called for a second EU referendum on a number of occasions, spoke in Parliament about the new deal. She said: “According to the forecast, this deal will lead to reductions in growth and jobs. “Other countries would keep in place rotas to stop farmers from being undercut.

“However, this government has set the quotas so high that they have become utterly meaningless.”

Ms Thornberry shared the video of her speaking on Twitter, with a caption that called out the Government for the decisions made during the deal.

She tweeted: “With their New Zealand deal last night, and their announcements today erasing the role and ignoring the recommendations of the Trade and Agriculture Commission, the government has given up any pretence of concern for our farming communities.”

Ms Thornberry was part of the Labour campaign in 2019, which suffered a heavy defeat at the hands of the Brexit-backing Conservative Party.

Her latest tirade against the UK’s deal with New Zealand could show Labour’s true colours on Brexit once more.

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KEY EVENTS

  • Lord Frost blasts Biden Government leaks attacking Brexit Britain15:02
  • Brexit-bashing MPs fire back at New Zealand trade deal12:16
  • France set to announce sanctions for UK in fishing row – ‘Respect the agreement’10:32
  • MPs prepare for showdown over New Zealand trade deal09:07
  • French Education Minister wants a new focus on French values and secularism

    France is at war with American “wokeism”, a local Education Minister Jean-Michel Blanquer has said as he launches his own think tank on Republican values and French secularism.

    Blanquer, 56, has worked for the Education Ministry under both conservative presidents Jacques Chirac and Nicolas Sarkozy before his appointment as Education Minister by Macron in 2017. 

    As the country prepares for its 2022 presidential elections, Mr Blanquer has just started his own think tank called Le Laboratoire de la République.

    By inviting thinkers like conservative feminist Elisabeth Badinter or writer Rachel Khan who is promoting a colour-blind fight against racism, the think tank wishes to share ideas as counterattacks to what they call US-imported “wokeism.”

    “In America, this ideology birthed the Donald Trump presidency through a knock-on effect,” Blanquer told Le Monde.

    “France and its youth have to avoid that scenario.

    “Our laboratory will have a republican vision that is fully opposed to the devising and fragmenting woke doctrine.”

    International Trade Secretary self-congratulates after £2.3bn New Zealand deal

    In an article for the Telegraph, the recently appointed Secretary for International Trade said the deal will give British enterprise “the competitive edge” in the fast-growing market of “one of our oldest and closest allies”. 

    She wrote: “This week is proving to be the biggest yet in realising our vision for Global Britain.

    “On Tuesday, we hosted the Global Investment Summit, which saw the world’s leading investors commit nearly £10 billion to the industries of the future across the UK.

    “Today, we are proud to announce we have secured a free trade agreement in principle with one of our oldest and closest allies: New Zealand.

    “This agreement shows what Britain can achieve through an independent trade policy, by slashing red tape for small businesses, securing zero-tariff access to New Zealand for all British goods and opening up their market to our world-class tech and services companies.”

    The deal was signed yesterday with New Zealand PM Jacinda Arden after 16 months of talks by Department for International Trade negotiators.

    Brussels could SUE its own Commission over Polish conflict

    Brussels and Warsaw have been locked in a tense deadlock in recent weeks as a Polish tribunal ruled that elements of EU law are incompatible with the country’s constitution.

    The tribunal ruled last month: “The effort by the Court of Justice of the European Union to interfere in the Polish justice system violates the principle of rule of law, the principle of the primacy of the Polish constitution as well as the principle of retaining sovereignty in the process of European integration.”

    The ruling is being considered a huge step toward a potential exit from the European Union against the backdrop of major rows between Poland’s rulers and the bloc’s big players.

    Leaders from the European Parliament said they would launch legal action if the European Commission President refused to use the bloc’s “conditionality mechanism” to block funding to Poland.

    Ahead of the EU Summit this week, David Sassoli, the European Parliament’s president, announced the plans to sue Ms von der Leyen if action isn’t taken against Poland – where support of membership is still incredibly high with the public.

    He said: “EU Member States that violate the rule of law should not receive EU funds.”

    “I have therefore asked our legal services to prepare a lawsuit against the Commission to ensure that EU rules are properly enforced.”

    Energy crisis could hike up costs of these popular British brands

    The price of everyday goods is expected to rise as brands warn they are struggling to cope with rising inflation. Consumer giant Unilever has warned it will hike the prices of some of the nation’s most beloved products, saying rising wholesale costs are also to blame.

    Bottleneck supply chain issues have occurred as parts of the world emerge from the coronavirus pandemic.

    The UK is particularly badly affected due to post-brexit trade and immigration rules.

    Costs of the ongoing energy crisis have had a crippling effect on businesses.

    Unilever CEO Alan Jope said: “We have and will continue to respond across our categories and markets, taking appropriate pricing action and implementing a range of productivity measures to offset increased costs.

    Unilever has numerous brands under its umbrella, such as Marmite, PG Tips, Dove, Ben & Jerry’s, Hellman’s and Knorr.

    Brexit festival mocked by Remainers over veggies controversy

    A “grow your own veg” project will be part of the £120million festival of Brexit celebrations.

    The grow-your-own food project of modern times will be among the events being staged for a nationwide festival of creativity in 2022.

    Commenting on the festival, Remainers took the chance to mock Brexit, P Murphy said: “Thinking Craggy Island fair.”

    Macron ready to put sanctions in place against UK in November amid fishing war

    The tensions stem from a dispute over how the UK-EU trade agreement should be implemented, with France claiming that the UK has broken the December 2020 Brexit agreement by only granting 200 fishing licences to French fishermen. Two hundred and 30 fishing licences are still pending.

    The final deadline for validation of these licences is October 30, after which time the French government has said it will implement sanctions against the UK.

    But Don Thompson, head of the Jersey Fishermen’s Association, told ITV News the Government’s decision to grant even 100 new fishing licences to French crews is a “death warrant” for the island’s own fishing industry, suggesting some fishermen face “certain bankruptcy”.

    Emmanuel Macron has called on ministers to consider possible retaliatory measures, which would be applied at the start of November if there are still fishermen without licences.

    According to French newspaper Le Figaro, possible sanctions could include an electricity tariff on the supply of energy to Jersey, which is supplied by France, or the restriction of British access to French ports.

    Poland to block EU climate pact after clash over local rule of law

    Poland has seen its access to the Covid recovery package cut after a conflict over a new rule of law. Now the EU member is ready to put the EU climate pact in jeopardy.

    The EU’s Covid-recovery package is a multi-billion euro fund that is part of the EU’s long term budget to boost the economies of EU member states as they recover from the pandemic.

    But Poland has clashed with Brussels over the defiance of the bloc’s legal order, or the rule of the law, and has been excluded from the fund as a result.

    The EU has also threatened to slap sanctions on Poland over a ruling by its highest court that some parts of EU law are incompatible with the Polish constitution.

    Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki said on Tuesday that the EU was using “financial blackmail” in delaying 36 billion euros ($42billion) in stimulus funds.

    And Waldemar Buda, a deputy minister of EU funds and regional development for Poland, said on Wednesday that there are “several reasons” for Poland to block the EU climate pact in its current form.

    He said: “It should be on our terms.”

    EU leaders ask Merkel to get back at Poland before her swan song

    The German leader has faced calls from leaders including Emmanuel Macron to punish Poland in her final summit as Chancellor.

    Ms Merkel, 67, urged her counterparts to relax tensions as Polexit fears continue to grow. The outgoing Chancellor said the EU must learn from Brexit, saying the UK’s departure could have been avoided.

    In her 107th summit, Ms Merkel said: “Germany does not want to have a Polexit.

    “Poland’s place is in the middle of Europe.

    “We must not talk about how to isolate. We must try to fix the problem.”

    President Emmanuel Macron, Mark Rutte, the Dutch prime minister, and David Sassoli have all united in the Parliament with a unified call for Poland to be punished in the “coming weeks”.

    Lord Frost blasts Biden govt leaks attacking Brexit Britain

    Lord Frost has attacked Joe Biden over his criticism of the UK’s renegotiation of the Northern Ireland Protocol.

    The comments from Lord Frost comes after a US newspaper said President Biden had told officials to urge Mr Johnson not to do “anything that would jeopardise” the Good Friday Agreement.

    Lord Frost said: “We have as a Government our our dialogue with the US government that doesn’t depend on messages in the New York Times.

    “I would refer back to the statement made by the Prime Minister when he was in Washington last month.

    “He noted that President Biden and himself were completely at one on the importance of the protecting of the Good Friday Agreement.”

    Remoaner Adonis continues anti-Brexit tirade with ‘oven-ready’ quip for Frost

    Staunch remoaner Andrew Adonis has slammed the UK’s “oven-ready” Brexit deal.

    Lord Adonis took to Twitter to blast the UK’s Brexit deal.

    He tweeted: “About to question Lord Frost in the House of Lords on why his “oven-ready” Brexit treaty fell apart before it even got into the oven”. 

    Mr Adonis had blasted Lord Frost this week by saying he was “gratuitously insulting our European partners” 

    Lord Adonis had spoke at the Labour Party Conference last month, saying rejoining the EU was the UK’s “destiny”.

    UK ‘strategically placed in strong Breixt position’ says New Zealand’s ex-trade minister

    The UK has been praised for its ambitions trade deals by a former Trade Minister.

    New Zealand’s former Trade Minister Tim Groser said that he was impressed with how the UK were conducting their trade deals.

    Mr Groser said: “I am beginning to rethink my entire position on Brexit.

    “This is in light of both the Australia-UK deal and the New Zealand deal.

    “Let me first declare my self-interest here, I am actually British, I was born and spent the first 10 years of my life in the UK.

    “I was brought up in a typical British middle-class family.

    “I would have voted against Brexit and now I am beginning to think that would have been the wrong strategic move.”

    ‘Brexit proves we don’t need EU!’ Nexit calls erupt as UK signs deal with New Zealand

    Calls have been made by the Netherlands to leave the EU after Brexit Britain agrees a successful trade deal with New Zealand.

    The deal between the UK and New Zealand is expected to reduce tariffs and improve services trade.

    Nexit Denktank campaigners said: “Europhiles keep saying that with the EU we are stronger and in a better position.

    “The truth is that the EU does not yet have any free trade agreements with Australia and New Zealand.

    “The UK alone does. Due to EU rules, we are not allowed to conclude trade agreements ourselves.

    “What the Netherlands needs are good trade agreements, not an unelected EU lecturing us.

    “We are the fourth largest exporter in the world.

    “Countries all over the world want to sign free trade agreements with us.

    “The British are proving that we don’t need the EU.”

    Spain issues final ultimatum over ‘decolonisation’ of Gibraltar- Brexit row erupts on Rock

    Spain emphasised its “willingness” to sit down with the UK over the sovereignty in Gibraltar.

    Agustin Santos, Spanish Ambassador to the United Nations, told the UN Decolonisation Committee: “Spain understands that the negotiations that must lead to the effective decolonisation of Gibraltar can only take place with full respect for international law and within the framework of the doctrine established by the United Nations.”

    He added: “Unfortunately, the administering power of Gibraltar, the United Kingdom, has ignored the doctrine of this organisation.”

    Mr Santos went on to say: “On rare occasions, Spain’s willingness to negotiate has met with a positive response from the United Kingdom.”

    Macron ready to block UK from £80bn EU programme as Brexit fishing row erupts

    Emmanuel Macron may block the UK from the EU’s €95.5billion (£80billion) research and innovation programme, unless the UK gives in over the fishing row.

    Macron has warned the UK that France will veto the UK’s associate membership of the Horizon Europe project if the UK does not grant more fishing licenses to EU vessels.

    France’s Europe Minister, Clement Beaune said: “The British want access to European programmes, scientific exchanges, research funding… they want to participate, we are saying first respect the agreement.”

    The close ally of the French President added: “We have levers. The British need us more than we need them.”

    Thornberry shows Labour’s true colours as she pulls rug from under UK-NZ deal

    EMILY THORNBERRY has taken aim at the Government over the UK’s recent deal with the UK.

    Ms Thornberry, who has been very much in favour of Remain, and has also called for a second referendum on a number of occasions, spoke in Parliament about the new deal.

    She said: “According to the forecast, this deal will lead to reductions in growth and jobs.

    “Other countries would keep in place rotas to stop farmers from being undercut.

    “However, this government has set the quotas so high that they have become utterly meaningless.”

    Ms Thornberry shared the video of her speaking on Twitter, with a caption which called out the Government for the decisions made during the deal.

    She tweeted: “With their New Zealand deal last night, and their announcements today erasing the role and ignoring the recommendations of the Trade and Agriculture Commission, the government has given up any pretence of concern for our farming communities.”

    Lord Frost blasts Biden Government leaks attacking Brexit Britain

    The UK’s Brexit minister has lashed out at Joe Biden’s administration for anonymous briefings criticising Britain’s negotiations on the Northern Ireland Protocol.

    Answering questions from peers in the House of Lords, he said the UK and US were close allies who should not rely on talking to the media to relay messages.

    A US newspaper had claimed President Biden had told officials to urge Mr Johnson not to do “anything that would jeopardise” the Good Friday Agreement.

    It added: “Pressure from the American President may cause Mr Johnson to think twice about provoking another destabilising clash with Brussels.”

    But Lord Frost hit back: “We have as a Government our our dialogue with the US government that doesn’t depend on messages in the New York Times.

    “I would refer back to the statement made by the Prime Minister when he was in Washington last month.

    “He noted that President Biden and himself were completely at one on the importance of the protecting of the Good Friday Agreement.”

    CBI warns Government against new business tax rises in Autumn Budget

    Director general Tony Danker said: “We cannot take the economic recovery for granted.

    “If the UK is to break out of a decade-plus cycle of anaemic growth and zero productivity, then the Government has to get serious about what it will actually take to deliver that.

    “There is a fundamental inconsistency where the Government wants to unlock business investment, but its tax policies do the opposite. You cannot will the ends and ignore the means to turbocharge the economy. Every economist and business leader knows it.

    “This is the Government’s first spending review since the pandemic hit and Brexit kicked in. It must choose: Are we going for growth? Or going back to tax and spend?

    “Business and Government is united in its ambitions for the country, but it will take more working hand-in-glove to actually achieve them.”

    Brexit-bashing MPs fire back at New Zealand trade deal

    The UK Government has been told to focus on fixing the “flawed deal with the EU” by Brexit-bashing MPs following the announcement of a £2.3billion trade deal with New Zealand.

    A group of largely former Remainer MPs have argued the agreement is worth a lot less than trade with the EU and ministers should concentrate on repairing relations with Brussels.

    Hilary Benn MP, Chair of the cross-party, cross-industry UK Trade and Business Commission, said: “I welcome this announcement, but geographically, New Zealand is one of the most distant countries from us.

    “And with a much smaller population than the UK, export opportunities from a new deal will be, while welcome, small in terms of our overall trade.

    “Increasing trade with distant nations, with all the CO2 emissions involved in transporting goods, raises profound questions ahead of COP26.

    “That’s why the Government must work to improve their flawed deal with the EU to support struggling British businesses and do more to maintain our climate commitments.”

    Frost faces questions in the House of Lords

    The UK’s Brexit minister Lord Frost will face questions in the House of Lords this morning.

    He will likely be quizzed on the latest developments in talks with the EU over the Northern Ireland Protocol.

    Lord Frost could also be asked about the recently-announced trade deal with New Zealand, which has sparked fears among farmers’ unions.

    France set to announce sanctions for UK in fishing row – ‘Respect the agreement’

    Emmanuel Macron’s Government is ready to announce punishments against the UK as the latest fishing row between the two countries continues to escalate.

    The French have been left furious by the UK Government’s refusal to grant what it believes to be the full number of licenses for their boats to operate in Britain’s waters.

    Government spokesman Gabriel Attal warned: “We put ourselves in a position to take sanctions as soon as the agreements are not respected”, referring to possible punishments that could be applied “during the month of November”.

    He added: “So it is on October 30 that we will see if until the end they have not respected the agreement that has been signed.

    “There are several types of sanctions that are possible – on electricity tariffs, on access to ports, on customs issues.

    “Other measures are also possible.”

    MPs prepare for showdown over New Zealand trade deal

    A debate is set to take place between MPs in the House of Commons about the new Brexit trade deal with New Zealand.

    Boris Johnson has committed to the agreement which he has promised will benefit both consumers and businesses.

    The trade deal will cut costs for exporters and open the door further for British professionals looking to get a foot into New Zealand’s job market.

    It will also see tariffs removed on UK goods including clothing, ships and bulldozers, and on New Zealand goods including wine, honey and kiwi fruits.

    But the National Farmers Union (NFU) has argued the deal could hurt UK farmers and lower food standards.

    Boris Johnson’s masterplan strikes FEAR in EU – expert

    The EU has been warned about its relations with Boris Johnson by a leading German political commentator.

    Brussels has “misjudged” the Prime Minister and also been caught off guard by the emerging axis between the UK and Turkey.

    With both countries having fractious relations with Brussels, some in the EU have warned Erdogan now has a “new friend in Europe”.

    Hans-Jürgen Moritz has claimed the EU must watch the UK’s foreign policy extremely closely.

    He warned the possibility of an escalation with Turkey is now “considerable”, which could persuade Mr Johnson to form closer ties with the state.

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