Odds slashed on a white Christmas in 2020 as it could be ‘coldest winter ever’

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They are about as rare as a Christmas Day without a family member drinking too much and starting a row with an uncle over Charades.

There's usually more chance of a shouting-free festive episode of EastEnders than there is of a white Christmas.

But one leading bookmaker has slashed the odds on snow falling on December 25, and it's getting people rather excited.

Coral has cut its odds on there being a White Christmas  – snow anywhere in the UK on Christmas Day – to 5-4.

Well, after the miserable 2020 we've all endured, we're owed something special to say goodbye to a rotten year, right?

It is evens for this winter to be the coldest ever in the UK.

"Those dreaming of a White Christmas may get their wish this year as the odds on the white stuff falling on Christmas Day are falling fast," said Coral's John Hill.

"We may not have to wait until Christmas for snow fall either as temperatures are set to plunge over the next few days, which opens the door for a blanket of snow."

Technically, 2017 was the last white Christmas.

That is when a flake or two of snow fell – so anyone betting in that area would have been quids in.

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The last Christmas that could be considered a true 'white' one was back in 2010.

That year, snow coverings were reported by 83 per cent of the weather stations used by the Met Office to monitor snowfall, the highest amount ever recorded.

A decade on, could history repeat itself?

Coral's weather specials

Coldest winter on record – Evens

White Christmas anywhere in the UK – 5-4

Snow to fall anywhere in the UK in October – 2-1

Snow in Aberdeen on Christmas Day – 5-2

Snow in Glasgow on Christmas Day – 3-1

Snow in Manchester on Christmas Day – 4-1

Snow in London on Christmas Day – 5-1

  • Eastenders
  • Christmas
  • Family
  • London

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