Students horrified as teacher tells class to recreate sexual ‘w**kerman’ cartoon

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A high school teacher has been blasted for showing students a crude drawing about masturbation and asking them to recreate it.

The unnamed art tutor showed Year 8 pupils the image – called 'w**kerman' – during a lesson at Kurri Kurri High School in New South Wales, Australia.

Seemingly depicting a bald man who struggles to control his sex drive, it goes on to falsely allege a variety of problems he suffers from due to masturbating, including "swollen hands, "permanent erection", "mental illness" and how he needs "a seeing eye dog for blindness".

The bizarre artwork, which was shown to kids aged between 13 and 14, also claims the character "can't stop w**king".

Some of the pupils were left confused and upset by what they saw.

The drawing from 2001 was initially created to depict a man who had a strange superpower.

The teacher reportedly told pupils the drawing was an example of "toilet humour" before asking them to recreate it, the Telegraph reports.

One pupil refused to take part, but was worried her decision would affect her grade.

But a state education department official told News Corp: "No student ­received a negative referral in relation to this matter. The choice of material for this Year 8 Visual Arts lesson was not appropriate and could cause offence."

The teacher received a caution for the stunt and ordered not to show similar material in future, NSW Education Minister Sarah Mitchell said.

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"We have a policy in place which guides controversial issues in schools," she said.

"It remains my expectation and the department's that teachers adhere to this policy, use their common sense and use ­appropriate resources in the classroom.''

Art classes up to Year 10 are supposed to introduce students to the world of creativity, according to the New South Wales Education curriculum.

"Students learn about how art is shaped by different beliefs, values and meanings by exploring artists and artworks from different times and places and relationships in the art world between the artist – artwork – world – audience," its website states.

"They also explore how their own lives and experiences can influence their art making and critical and historical studies.

"Students learn to make artworks using a range of materials and techniques in 2D, 3D and 4D forms, including traditional and more contemporary forms, site-specific works, installations, video and digital media and other ICT forms, to build a body of work over time.

"They learn to develop their research skills, approaches to experimentation and how to make informed personal choices and judgements."

  • Students

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